Be an Active In-Person Networker

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“Who me? A networker?” you ask. Yes, you. But don’t let that overwhelm you. It’s not at all complicated to “network”—and it might come even more naturally to you than you think.

In today’s world, there is a myriad of ways to network online (think social media), and this is really important; however, it is just as important to network offline. Here at Inspira, while we have clients from far off places like Indonesia and England, Arkansas and Arizona, most of our clients are from the Pacific Northwest. And, the majority of our clients heard about our company through our in-person networking or through word of mouth. Many of our authors have found the same to be true. Their biggest book deals or speaking engagements have happened because they were able to meet someone face-to-face and share their passion.

Networking is all about exchanging information and developing contacts with the end goal of furthering your career, gaining clients for your business, or spreading the word about your book. When you are able to shake someone’s hand, you become more than just a name in a contact list; you become a face and a story. You can connect over the fact that your sons go to the same school or you both disliked the last conference speaker. More importantly, they are able to see your passion and better understand where the passion comes from.

When having a personal conversation, you are also able to tailor you message to your audience. You don’t have to speak in generalizations; instead, you can specifically say why your project would be beneficial to them.

Finally, in-person networking makes you memorable. You took up space in someone’s life and left an impression (hopefully a good one!). So, when the time comes and they are looking for a book in your specific subject, they will remember your conversation and buy yours!

  1. Always be prepared. You never know when you’ll meet a good networking connection. It could be at a big conference, but it could also be at the hairdresser or at a local football game. Be ready to talk about your book at any moment. If you haven’t already, memorize a 30-second “elevator pitch.” This can especially help if you are an introvert who gets nervous when you want to impress someone or articulate a concise idea. (Smelling nice and dressing professionally never hurts either!)
  1. Always carry business cards. Don’t make people rely on their memory; give them a tangible reminder of how they can contact you and get more information.
  1. Think local. People are often very willing to support local business and authors. Develop a relationship with your local media, including radio, newspaper, and TV connections. Talk to your local library and offer to host a reading or a workshop.
  1. Be personable. Don’t dismiss the power of a solid handshake and good eye contact. You are your best marketing tool, so don’t sell yourself short. Share your passion, and people will catch hold of your vision.

“Sometimes, idealistic people are put off by the whole business of networking as something tainted by flattery and the pursuit of selfish advantage. But virtue in obscurity is rewarded only in Heaven. To succeed in this world you have to be known to people.” ~Sonia Sotomayer

Setting Yourself up for Success During the Holidays

A little while ago we wrote a blog called “What Gets Scheduled Is What Gets Done!” in which we encouraged writers to make an action plan and schedule their writing. However, that was back in the summer when we were all optimistic about our time and energy. It is easy to make grand plans during the bright summer sunny days.

Unfortunately, here in the Pacific Northwest, it is no longer sunny and perhaps many of you, like myself, are struggling to keep up with your projects. This is not going to get easier as the holiday season approaches! However, don’t let one or two off days (or weeks or months!) discourage you from writing. The important thing is that your project gets finished and your ideas get shared with the world. Progress is not about perfection, but perseverance.

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If you have a writing goal you have put down on paper, try to stick to it. Take realistic stock of your time and what can get done, and then guard your writing hours! This will mean planning ahead. This may even mean saying no. Really take some time to reflect on the importance of your writing and your writing deadline. The reality is, this season of life may mean making sacrifices for your project. (If you do not have a writing goal and/or do not schedule your writing time, now is a great time to  do so!)

Why is it so important to set yourself up for success during the holidays? Many people find it hard to stick to their normal routine during the holidays as their schedules fills up with activities and social events. With so much to do and more people around the house, it’s hard to put time into extra personal projects, like writing a book.

Before the holidays begin, take some time to think about the challenges of keeping your writing routine during the holidays and create a plan to handle them as they arise. Here is a self-reflection/ journaling exercise you can use:

  1. List the challenges you face during the holidays/vacation:
  2. List possible strategies/tips to set yourself up for success during the holidays/vacation:
  3. Identify one or two commitments you will make to yourself regarding these strategies:

Success in writing, or anything else, is rarely achieved in one fell swoop.  It is more often attained in slow, methodical progress toward a goal.  With that in mind, here’s to keeping your eye on the finish line—and to reaching it!

Writing Well-Organized Chapters

I love bulletins. Whenever I go to an event I make sure to grab one at the door so I can meticulously follow along as the event progresses. At choir concerts, I keep my finger on the current song, and make sure I know what song is coming next. Same with the theater. You better believe I always know what act we are in.

I don’t do this because I am bored or distracted, rather because I love to know what is coming up. It gives me a sense of security because I know exactly what I have gotten myself into and how to prepare. Oh! This show is three hours long with five acts? Let me go to the bathroom now!

Think of the first few paragraphs of a chapter as the usher standing outside the theater doors. He is there to welcome people in, hand out the bulletin, and help people find their seats. Once the audience is comfortably settled in to their seats, they start to peruse the bulletin. If they anticipate they’re going to be there awhile, the audience wants to know what they’re in for.

The same is true with writing. When readers start a chapter of your book, they want to know what they’re in for. Introduce your topic to your reader and then tell them how you are going to say it. This shows your reader you are organized and allows them to prepare. Think of these statements as signposts along the road of your writing: “Next chapter three examples ahead!”

Coast_to_coast_signpost_Rogan's_Seat.jpgWriters often leave out these signposts because they are afraid of sounding pedantic, robotic, or repetitive. However, these signposts do not need to lengthy; they can be a short sentence or two, or even a numbered list. Instead of detracting from your writing, a signpost will show structure, organization, and reinforce your ideas. In fact, far from being impersonal, these signposts help your reader feel like you are right beside them, walking them through your writing.

Another reason writers leave out signposts is because their writing isn’t well-organized and therefore they cannot explain the structure in advance. A clear signpost can help the writer say on track as much as the reader!

So, before you write next chapter of your book, make sure your readers know what they are getting themselves into! (Just in case they need to take a bathroom break first!)

This post was written by Kerry Wade, Assistant Editor.